Tag Archives: More Magazine

Our Moms Burned Their Bras, We Need to Burn Our Tape Measures

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I am not a person who is easily offended…truly. Nor do I take up causes without a lot of thought. But I think I’m about to now. Since I was a young girl, I have been bothered by the diet culture of females in this country. Women always worrying about their weight, always talking about their weight, and passing that on to their daughters, who seem to be worrying about it more and more these days, younger and younger. And now, it seems I cannot turn on my t.v. or go to a movie without seeing a female celebrity who is so underweight that I worry about their health. Frankly, this looks especially bad on those of us who are over 40, because it makes a person look older than they are. Yet, inevitably, everyone continually talks about how ahhhh-maaaaa-zing they look, and how “rockin” their “bod” is. Am I the only one who sees that these poor women look like they should be in the hospital, hooked up to an I.V., not on the Red Carpet?

Clearly from the looks of her collarbone area, this woman is meant to have probably another 20 pounds on her at least. Starvation is NOT sexy!

There are no words for how bad this is….

I love Teri to pieces, and I think she is probably the nicest, most genuine celebrity out there. But, she is way, way too thin. Think back to how she looked even in her Lois and Clark days…this is not even close.

Love Mary, LOVE her show “Weeds”, hate that she doesn’t feel as if she can put on about 30 pounds more and still be hot!

And she’s often the one with the microphone fawning all over the emaciated celebrities and telling them how ahhh-maaaa-zing they look. No wonder she feels as if she has to be just as thin, if not thinner than they are….

I was especially disheartened to see a report this week stating that magazine editors routinely cut size tags out of clothing for celebrities, so that they can stroke the celebs’ egos. Therefore, if a star is a size 10, but wants to be a 6, the editor will play along so as to not upset the cash cow, I guess. While I applaud More’s editor for being honest, I am extremely troubled by this practice, not for the individual star, but for the promotion of a culture where women and girls feel that they must be underweight to be beautiful, sexy, and minimally acceptable. We’ve gone too far, folks, and we need to put a stop to it.

Here’s the thing, I am a huge proponent of health and not being overweight. Everyone, male and female, should strive to stay within their healthy weight range. That’s according to this scale: http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi/  Note that there is a very wide range of healthy weights at every height, and there are NO women who will fall within the healthy range at 5 ft. 8 in. and a size 2—that just doesn’t add up. And, we should all consult our doctors at our yearly checkup to make sure that he/she thinks we are on track with not only weight, but all of the health indicators as well. We should all get some exercise every day—I prefer walking, myself.  If you’re spending hours a day exercising and it’s not because you’re training for Iron Man, then you’re doing too much. Period.

I went today to try on bathing suits and felt anxious the entire time. The fluorescent lights and three way mirror didn’t help, I’m sure….BUT, enough is enough. I’m not overweight, I do exercise, and I look pretty dang good for a 45 year old who has had three babies. There is absolutely nothing wrong with the way I look, and nothing wrong with the way I looked in that suit I bought either. I am bigger on bottom, always have been, and the only time I ever had legs that were even approaching the thinness I see on celebrities, I was underweight and in my 20’s.

Your body is your body, and the only way to make yourself thin all over probably is to starve yourself. Very few of us are born with perfect proportions. Maybe you have bigger legs like me…maybe you have a thicker waist….etc.. Everyone is different. I say we don’t tolerate this extremely thin celebrity culture anymore—tell the editors of your favorite magazines that you don’t want them to cut the tags out of celebrities’ clothing anymore for a photo shoot. Don’t envy that star on the Red Carpet anymore either, because God only knows what she had to do to herself to get that thin.

Be Healthy. Be Yourself. Be Happy. EAT! Let’s don’t pass this on to another generation….

The Art and Pathology of Pessimistic Optimism; Confessions of a Middle Aged Beauty Contestant

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If you’re ever asked to deliver my eulogy, you can tell your audience that I was pessimistically optimistic. Now, of course, they’ll all be too prostrate with grief to stop bawling long enough to stare at you like you’re crazy, but in case anybody asks, you can tell them that you say that about me because I never thought I was going to win anything, yet I kept acting as if I would. This is a major theme of my life, actually, definitely worth exploring on a good therapist’s couch someday, but if I spent as much time “exploring” in that way as I probably need to, I’d likely not get off the couch long enough to tend to my blog. This dichotomy of personality is what leads me to enter contests every now and then—contests that, truth be told, I probably don’t have a snowball’s chance of surviving a Florida summer of winning.


A few months ago, I entered the QVC/Bare Minerals “Women of B.E.” contest, in which the grand prize was a trip to the QVC studios, a Women of B.E. eyeshadow kit, and a chance to meet the company’s CEO of Swirl, Tap, and Buff, Ms. Leslie Blodgett. I really do love their makeup, and I like Leslie enough to follow her Tweets and her Facebook Fan Page. I’ve even interacted with her briefly on there, and it’s always fun when a well known person acknowledges your communication and talks back to you. But, as I knew I wouldn’t, but thought I might, I didn’t win that one—didn’t even make it to the top 10. Part of the problem is that in the case of most of these types of contests, the powers that be narrow down the competition to a manageable number by forcing participants to obtain a certain number of “Like” clicks on the internet before the actual judging begins. I don’t have as many close friends as a lot of women do, and am not willing to jeopardize the friendships I do have by nagging people nonstop to keep visiting my entry and clicking on it. I ask once, and that’s pretty much it. Nor am I willing to create 25 different Gmail accounts so that I can be my own best friend and click myself 25 extra times each day until the click voting ends. So, even though I know I’m never going to make it past the first cut, I am convinced that this time, I’m gonna go all the way, baby!

I’m at it again, this time with More Magazine’s annual “Beauty Search”. I resisted this one last year because, frankly, a middle aged beauty contest seemed just a shade past too silly, even for me. More is a great magazine for women who are no longer 25—sort of like Cosmo, Glamour, Vogue & Shape,  all rolled into one and directed at the over 40 female. But, as always with these things, that $10,000 grand prize and a chance to fly to New York and be photographed for the pages of More had my name on it! So, I wrote up my contest entry in about 5 minutes and pasted in that same picture from my blog that I took of myself into the little box, and impulsively became an aging beauty contestant. I might have increased my odds of winning if I’d put some more thought into what I wrote about “Why I Feel More Beautiful Than Ever”, or if I’d had some sort of professional photo taken of myself that didn’t involve saying cheese to the camera in my outstretched arm, but that’s just not how I roll. After all, I’m not going to win anyway, even though I will…


I did all of this in about an hour one morning, the picture’s not half bad, and I actually really meant all the things I said about beauty in my allotted 1500 characters or less. There is some stiff competition though…I never read the fine print in anything until after the fact, but in the last couple of days I was surprised to learn that the contest is open to women who will turn 35 by April, and up. So, there are some young hotties to contend with (I spotted more than one bikini clad rockin’ bod), as well as some ladies who are clearly professional models, or cancer survivors, or women who have triumphed over domestic violence, are running their own successful businesses, are doctors, lawyers, etc. Anyway, you get the picture. And then there’s me—this year’s winner. Be sure to look for me on the pages of More this summer, right after you read this Freshly Pressed blog on the WordPress Homepage…